2nd Annual ¡Sostenga! Garlic Harvest Festival

Camilla Bustamante

The Second Annual Garlic Harvest Festival will be held on Saturday, July 3rd at the Sostenga Farm on Rail Road Avenue at Northern New Mexico College in Espanola. The annual harvest usually falls on the 4th of July but this year the holiday fell on a Sunday, which presented a double conflict for many community members. “Most years it will not coincide with the Santa Fe Farmers Market, but since it does, this year we invite all the farmers to get an early morning breakfast burrito on their way to Santa Fe,” said Jan Matteson, farmer and manager of the Sostenga Commercial Kitchen. Breakfast burritos will be served for 5 dollars or 5 gallons of garlic.

The¡Sostenga! Garlic Harvest Festival provides a holiday weekend place for community members and visitors to celebrate, participate in fun activities, eat and raise money for the Sostenga Center, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Familias Unidas del Norte, and other related initiatives. This year’s guest of honor will be Dr. Nancy (Rusty) Barceló, the new president of Northern New Mexico College.

Schedule of Events:

6 am – Sunrise Harvest – Breakfast Served till 10:00 am

9 am – Music and Dances

Aztec Dancers, music by Frances Castellano and Elijah Trujillo

10 am –1 pm – Garlic pull Contests

11 am – 12 pm – Welcome and Invocation; Meet Dr. Barceló, Northern’s new President Dances, Music and snacks

Garlic Picking Contest

Teams may register to compete in the garlic harvest. Teams of five with two substitutes can download the registration form at www.sostengalavida.com. First place – $500, second place – $200, and third place – $100 will be awarded for the most garlic pulled by weight.

Booth and Table Space for Local Vendors

Interested parties who would like a table to demonstrate local products, arts and crafts or goods may download an application at www.sostengalavida.com.

History of the ¡Sostenga! Center

Established in 2007, the New Mexico State Legislature recognized the purpose of the ¡Sostenga! Center: “to serve in the interest of preserving the natural heritage of Northern New Mexico through hands-on learning and economic development, and as a center for collaboration and research.” Inherent in the indigenous metaphor “healthy environment, healthy people, healthy culture” (Cajete,1999), ¡Sostenga! seeks to support projects that foster sustainable living based on the premise that healthy food has long been a tradition

of Northern New Mexico and only in recent decades have generations moved away from the natural agricultural and land based heritage of the northern Rio Grande.

In fall of 2008 the ¡Sostenga! Center for Sustainable Food, Agriculture and Environment at Northern New Mexico College embarked on a systems-based ecoEconomic* effort that would create a cash crop that provides a location for students to learn basic principles of soil chemistry, water and crop management, and sustainable agriculture.

¡Sostenga! Garlic Supports Community-Based Commercial Kitchen and Student Learning

Community-based commercial kitchens must be affordable to local value added producers and still cover overhead, maintenance and unexpected costs. Successful kitchens are subsidized. Entities reliant on external funding collapse when the economy changes. The majority of the revenue from garlic and garlic product sales from the ¡Sostenga! field is used to cover expenses of the kitchen in order to keep costs to producers to a realistic minimum.

Student Master Farmer, Elijah Trujillo planted lettuce, radishes and other produce in the Sostenga greenhouse, of which the majority will be allowed to go to seed to assure yearlong salad ingredients that will be served in the Sostenga Tiendita. Currently the greenhouse uses conventional energy sources, which will be supplanted by more efficient and stable means with assistance from alternative energy resources.

Preparing for the Harvest

The 2009 Sostenga garlic crop was carefully planted deep enough to garner a strong root system. Since the first harvest the soil has revealed more beneficial organisms such as earthworms and other healthy soil bugs. Because only one seed was planted per shallow space, garlic will be harvested with one person turning over the bulbs and others collecting the turned garlic. The bulbs will be sorted by size and quality and placed on racks for drying. The garlic should never be pulled by the stock, as it will break off. The bulb continues to get moisture from the stem into the year, which is why braiding is a common way of preserving for the year.

Garlic Basics

Irrigation will stop at least 3 to 4 weeks prior to harvest in order to develop the protective hull of the garlic. Bulbs that are over watered get stressed and the hull cracks, which makes them more likely to mold or shelf harden. Drying of the garlic, both in-ground and after harvest increases shelf life and flavor. “Fresh” garlic has not developed full flavor.

Sostenga garlic will be available at local markets around Northern NM throughout the season. Northern will offer continuing education Sostenga Garlic classes starting fall 2010.

* Definition: ecoEconomics is the science and practice of living within our planet’s capacity to sustain us – indefinitely.

More information is available at www.sostengalavida.com. Camilla Bustamante, PhD, MPH is Chair of Math and Science, and Director of Environmental Science at Northern NM College. Email cbustamante@nnmc.edu.

Camilla Bustamante

The Second Annual Garlic Harvest Festival will be held on Saturday, July 3rd at the Sostenga Farm on Rail Road Avenue at Northern New Mexico College in Espanola. The annual harvest usually falls on the 4th of July but this year the holiday fell on a Sunday, which presented a double conflict for many community members. “Most years it will not coincide with the Santa Fe Farmers Market, but since it does, this year we invite all the farmers to get an early morning breakfast burrito on their way to Santa Fe,” said Jan Matteson, farmer and manager of the Sostenga Commercial Kitchen. Breakfast burritos will be served for 5 dollars or 5 gallons of garlic.

The¡Sostenga! Garlic Harvest Festival provides a holiday weekend place for community members and visitors to celebrate, participate in fun activities, eat and raise money for the Sostenga Center, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Familias Unidas del Norte, and other related initiatives. This year’s guest of honor will be Dr. Nancy (Rusty) Barceló, the new president of Northern New Mexico College.


Schedule of Events:
6 am – Sunrise Harvest – Breakfast Served till 10:00 am
9 am – Music and Dances
Aztec Dancers, music by Frances Castellano and Elijah Trujillo
10 am –1 pm – Garlic pull Contests
11 am – 12 pm – Welcome and Invocation; Meet Dr. Barceló, Northern’s new President Dances, Music and snacks

Garlic Picking Contest

Teams may register to compete in the garlic harvest. Teams of five with two substitutes can download the registration form at www.sostengalavida.com. First place $500, second place $200, and third place $100 will be awarded for the most garlic pulled by weight.

Booth and Table Space for Local Vendors

Interested parties who would like a table to demonstrate local products, arts and crafts or goods may download an application at www.sostengalavida.com.

History of the ¡Sostenga! Center

Established in 2007, the New Mexico State Legislature recognized the purpose of the ¡Sostenga! Center: “to serve in the interest of preserving the natural heritage of Northern New Mexico through hands-on learning and economic development, and as a center for collaboration and research.” Inherent in the indigenous metaphor “healthy environment, healthy people, healthy culture” (Cajete,1999), ¡Sostenga! seeks to support projects that foster sustainable living based on the premise that healthy food has long been a tradition

of Northern New Mexico and only in recent decades have generations moved away from the natural agricultural and land based heritage of the northern Rio Grande.

In fall of 2008 the ¡Sostenga! Center for Sustainable Food, Agriculture and Environment at Northern New Mexico College embarked on a systems-based ecoEconomic* effort that would create a cash crop that provides a location for students to learn basic principles of soil chemistry, water and crop management, and sustainable agriculture.

¡Sostenga! Garlic Supports Community-Based Commercial Kitchen and Student Learning

Community-based commercial kitchens must be affordable to local value added producers and still cover overhead, maintenance and unexpected costs. Successful kitchens are subsidized. Entities reliant on external funding collapse when the economy changes. The majority of the revenue from garlic and garlic product sales from the ¡Sostenga! field is used to cover expenses of the kitchen in order to keep costs to producers to a realistic minimum.

Student Master Farmer, Elijah Trujillo planted lettuce, radishes and other produce in the Sostenga greenhouse, of which the majority will be allowed to go to seed to assure yearlong salad ingredients that will be served in the Sostenga Tiendita. Currently the greenhouse uses conventional energy sources, which will be supplanted by more efficient and stable means with assistance from alternative energy resources.

Preparing for the Harvest

The 2009 Sostenga garlic crop was carefully planted deep enough to garner a strong root system. Since the first harvest the soil has revealed more beneficial organisms such as earthworms and other healthy soil bugs. Because only one seed was planted per shallow space, garlic will be harvested with one person turning over the bulbs and others collecting the turned garlic. The bulbs will be sorted by size and quality and placed on racks for drying. The garlic should never be pulled by the stock, as it will break off. The bulb continues to get moisture from the stem into the year, which is why braiding is a common way of preserving for the year.

Garlic Basics

Irrigation will stop at least 3 to 4 weeks prior to harvest in order to develop the protective hull of the garlic. Bulbs that are over watered get stressed and the hull cracks, which makes them more likely to mold or shelf harden. Drying of the garlic, both in-ground and after harvest increases shelf life and flavor. “Fresh” garlic has not developed full flavor.

Sostenga garlic will be available at local markets around Northern NM throughout the season. Northern will offer continuing education Sostenga Garlic classes starting fall 2010.

* Definition: ecoEconomics is the science and practice of living within our planet’s capacity to sustain us – indefinitely.

More information is available at www.sostengalavida.com. Camilla Bustamante, PhD, MPH is Chair of Math and Science, and Director of Environmental Science at Northern NM College. Email cbustamante@nnmc.edu.

2nd Annual ¡Sostenga! Garlic Harvest Festival

Camilla Bustamante

The Second Annual Garlic Harvest Festival will be held on Saturday, July 3rd at the Sostenga Farm on Rail Road Avenue at Northern New Mexico College in Espanola. The annual harvest usually falls on the 4th of July but this year the holiday fell on a Sunday, which presented a double conflict for many community members. “Most years it will not coincide with the Santa Fe Farmers Market, but since it does, this year we invite all the farmers to get an early morning breakfast burrito on their way to Santa Fe,” said Jan Matteson, farmer and manager of the Sostenga Commercial Kitchen. Breakfast burritos will be served for 5 dollars or 5 gallons of garlic.

The¡Sostenga! Garlic Harvest Festival provides a holiday weekend place for community members and visitors to celebrate, participate in fun activities, eat and raise money for the Sostenga Center, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Familias Unidas del Norte, and other related initiatives. This year’s guest of honor will be Dr. Nancy (Rusty) Barceló, the new president of Northern New Mexico College.


Schedule of Events:
6 am – Sunrise Harvest – Breakfast Served till 10:00 am
9 am – Music and Dances
Aztec Dancers, music by Frances Castellano and Elijah Trujillo
10 am –1 pm – Garlic pull Contests
11 am – 12 pm – Welcome and Invocation; Meet Dr. Barceló, Northern’s new President Dances, Music and snacks

Garlic Picking Contest

Teams may register to compete in the garlic harvest. Teams of five with two substitutes can download the registration form at www.sostengalavida.com. First place $500, second place $200, and third place $100 will be awarded for the most garlic pulled by weight.

Booth and Table Space for Local Vendors

Interested parties who would like a table to demonstrate local products, arts and crafts or goods may download an application at www.sostengalavida.com.

History of the ¡Sostenga! Center

Established in 2007, the New Mexico State Legislature recognized the purpose of the ¡Sostenga! Center: “to serve in the interest of preserving the natural heritage of Northern New Mexico through hands-on learning and economic development, and as a center for collaboration and research.” Inherent in the indigenous metaphor “healthy environment, healthy people, healthy culture” (Cajete,1999), ¡Sostenga! seeks to support projects that foster sustainable living based on the premise that healthy food has long been a tradition

of Northern New Mexico and only in recent decades have generations moved away from the natural agricultural and land based heritage of the northern Rio Grande.

In fall of 2008 the ¡Sostenga! Center for Sustainable Food, Agriculture and Environment at Northern New Mexico College embarked on a systems-based ecoEconomic* effort that would create a cash crop that provides a location for students to learn basic principles of soil chemistry, water and crop management, and sustainable agriculture.

¡Sostenga! Garlic Supports Community-Based Commercial Kitchen and Student Learning

Community-based commercial kitchens must be affordable to local value added producers and still cover overhead, maintenance and unexpected costs. Successful kitchens are subsidized. Entities reliant on external funding collapse when the economy changes. The majority of the revenue from garlic and garlic product sales from the ¡Sostenga! field is used to cover expenses of the kitchen in order to keep costs to producers to a realistic minimum.

Student Master Farmer, Elijah Trujillo planted lettuce, radishes and other produce in the Sostenga greenhouse, of which the majority will be allowed to go to seed to assure yearlong salad ingredients that will be served in the Sostenga Tiendita. Currently the greenhouse uses conventional energy sources, which will be supplanted by more efficient and stable means with assistance from alternative energy resources.

Preparing for the Harvest

The 2009 Sostenga garlic crop was carefully planted deep enough to garner a strong root system. Since the first harvest the soil has revealed more beneficial organisms such as earthworms and other healthy soil bugs. Because only one seed was planted per shallow space, garlic will be harvested with one person turning over the bulbs and others collecting the turned garlic. The bulbs will be sorted by size and quality and placed on racks for drying. The garlic should never be pulled by the stock, as it will break off. The bulb continues to get moisture from the stem into the year, which is why braiding is a common way of preserving for the year.

Garlic Basics

Irrigation will stop at least 3 to 4 weeks prior to harvest in order to develop the protective hull of the garlic. Bulbs that are over watered get stressed and the hull cracks, which makes them more likely to mold or shelf harden. Drying of the garlic, both in-ground and after harvest increases shelf life and flavor. “Fresh” garlic has not developed full flavor.

Sostenga garlic will be available at local markets around Northern NM throughout the season. Northern will offer continuing education Sostenga Garlic classes starting fall 2010.

* Definition: ecoEconomics is the science and practice of living within our planet’s capacity to sustain us – indefinitely.

More information is available at www.sostengalavida.com. Camilla Bustamante, PhD, MPH is Chair of Math and Science, and Director of Environmental Science at Northern NM College. Email cbustamante@nnmc.edu.