October 2010

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October 2010 Edition

Going Green, Being Local Ahead of The Green Business Curve, NM Film Is Not Hollywood; It’s Tamalewood, The Farm to Restaurant Project, A Recipe for a Healthy Community, BALLE Hub Networks and Community of Practice, Santa Fe Youth Food Cadre, Our Local Economy’s Most Valuable  Resource, Everyday Green: Culture and Economies, Convide: A Sustainable Philosophy, Finance For Food & Farming in New Mexico, La Montañita Co-op’s New Grassroots Lending Project, Time Banks: No More Throwaway People, Can Western Women Save The World? The Local Voice: Where I Come From, Santa Fe Community College: Deep Greening, Jump start New Mexico’s Economy: More >

Our Local Economy’s Most Valuable Resource

by Nate Downey

Since the days of the Spanish explorer Onate, tourism has brought northern New Mexico more money than any other industry. But tourists are not our local economy’s most valuable resource. That would be water.

We often hear about how the people of the Rio Grande Valley survived through many dry spells over the centuries. Perhaps we don’t talk enough about how, during a drought, the 900-year-old Hokoman culture vanished from what is now southern Arizona. Without water, civilizations disappear.

New Mexico’s water supply is shrinking at an alarming rate. Sure, the Buckman Diversion project will buy Santa Fe some time, More >

NM Film is Not Hollywood, it’s Tamalewood

by Jon Hendry

You’ve seen the stars around town, the trucks and trailers, the ubiquitous yellow signs with initials, and perhaps the billboards touting “the largest job creation program since the Manhattan Project.” The movie business is clearly here in New Mexico, but are you seeing that business on your bottom line? Since prioritizing motion picture and television as a target for economic development growth in the late 1990’s, NM has gone from a backwater in the movie business (albeit the original home of movies in the U.S.) to one of the biggest production centers outside of New York & Los More >

The Farm to Restaurant Project

by Kathleen Chambers

I thought it would be best to start this article as I do every Thursday with my introduction of Cook with the Chef culinary demonstrations at the Santa Fe Farmers Market: The Farm to Restaurant Project (F2R) showcases local chefs of independently owned restaurants who support regional food producers, whether they have direct relationships with farmers who deliver to their doors, or they come down to the farmers’ market, or they are part of the pilot distribution project.

In the current global food system where food is mass produced, sprayed with chemicals and transported hundreds of miles to get More >

Everyday Green – Culture and Economies

by Susan Guyette

Sustainable economy-building strengthens the foundation of a culture by working with, rather than against, the values of a community. New Mexico still retains many of the economic strengths stemming from diversity, now lost in most regions of the U.S.  Discovering ways of moving forward with economic development while retaining the cultural preciousness and uniqueness of local cultures depends upon understanding the important interplay between culture and traditional economies.

Eco-cultural sustainability requires listening to indigenous methodologies, and describing the framework for economies that work from within those cultures, rather than instituting an outsider point of view. This re-integration is More >

Can Western Women Save the World?

The Dalai Lama thinks so.

by Carolyn Parrs

His Holiness the Dalai Lama made a stunning proclamation last year at a Peace Summit in Vancouver. He said, “The world will be saved by the Western woman.” This statement shocked the audience and started a tsunami of responses in cyberspace. Can you imagine? Women saving the world?

After the initial elation I felt hearing such a highly respected male leader make such a statement, I thought to myself, duh, of course it will be women. We make 85% of the consumer purchases. We can save the world right now by what we buy – More >

A Recipe for A Healthy Community

by Kate Manchester

I first met Vicki Pozzebon in 2006, shortly after I started Edible Santa Fe, and just after she had taken the reigns as Executive Director for the Santa Fe Independent Business Alliance. The setting was a first Tuesday Alliance meeting. It was the first time I’d attended, and I didn’t anticipate the ways in which our paths would soon merge. For several years after, I had the good fortune to share a community office across the hall from the Alliance, where my friendship and connection to Vicki and the Alliance blossomed. Over countless morning chats fueled by coffee More >

Convide: A Sustainable Philosophy

Juan Estevan Arellano

Nowadays there is so much confusion about what is “sustainable,” “organic,” or “natural” food, that as Indo-Hispanos, we sometimes forget our own ancestral models that have worked historically and make more sense. One such concept that has fallen by the wayside as we embrace and debate such abstract concepts as “food security” and “food democracy” is the philosophy of convide, or the sharing of food among neighbors.

Indo-Hispano (Chicana/o) communities have been sharing water and food since time immemorial. The sharing of the water comes from the concept of equidad, or equality, as stated in the Quran, and is More >

BALLE Hub Networks and Community of Practice

Working Locally, Networking Nationally

Vicki Pozzebon

May 2010 marked my four-year anniversary as the Executive Director of the Santa Fe Alliance. It went by without much notice – until I started to prepare for the 2010 Business Alliance for Local Living Economy (BALLE) National Conference in Charleston, SC. I was working diligently, preparing to lead a day of events for executive directors and network leaders to kick off the conference. But I was stuck. It was like writer’s block but worse because I had to come up with interesting ideas to connect these leaders from all over the country.

Most of our networks More >

The Local Voice – Where I Come From

by Vicki Pozzebon

When I started my journey with the Santa Fe Alliance in 2006 it didn’t occur to me that my family background would have such a big influence on my daily work. I have a Master’s Degree in Theatre Arts, not a background in economic development. Our “new economy” experts have told me that my lack of economic development experience means I have nothing to unlearn when it comes to the work I do.  When the Santa Fe Alliance began to build out a project to localize food and energy economies for greater community wealth I puzzled over the More >

No More Throwaway People

Iginia Boccalandro

Is time money? All too often, the answer is “no.” Looking after elderly parents and young children, volunteering for community projects, renovating the environment to reduce water and energy consumption – these efforts, though vital for our very survival as a people, go unpaid and uncounted by the way we traditionally measure economic production.

Enter “Time Banking.”

Lack of money or social connections usually keep people from the goods and services they need. With Time Banking, people exchange time. They can help each other and receive credits for their service. Anyone who helps another member earns one time dollar per More >

The Santa Fe Alliance Has a Story to Tell

When GFT Editor, Seth Roffman approached me about collaborating on an entire issue reflecting the “universe of the Santa Fe Alliance” I was a little overwhelmed. Where do I start? When will I find the time? Who do I call first? We are involved in so many different facets of a local living economy because you cannot have a successful, vibrant sustainable one without all the connecting pieces. It’s the work of the Alliance to educate the community on how a dollar spent here stays here and what it does for our local economy, but it is the work of More >

Finance for Food & Farming in New Mexico: “Don’t tell me no – tell me how!”

Finance for Food & Farming in New Mexico: “Don’t tell me no – tell me how!”

Tawnya Laveta

What can a small group of people accomplish in the midst of chilling economic forecasts and banks rejecting loan applications from stellar customers they’ve lent to for 30 years? The 6 month-old Finance for Food & Farming working group is composed of organizations that have created micro-financing opportunities for farmers and food enterprises to help these small businesses grow and meet the increasing demand for local food in New Mexico.

As leaders in the field, the Permaculture Credit Union (PCU), and Santa Farmers’ Market Institute More >

Going Green, Being Local: Ahead of the Green Business Curve

by Beverly Miriam Post

“Sustainability means operating a business so as to grow and earn profit while recognizing and supporting the economic and non-economic aspirations of people both inside and outside the organization on whom the corporation depend.” – The Triple Bottom Line by Andrew W. Savitz with Karl Weber, © Jossey-Bass 2006.

One of the things that distinguishes Santa Fe Alliance business members is their passionate belief in—and dedication to—a local, sustainable economy. Both in their personal choices as consumers, and in the ways they conduct their businesses, many Alliance members embody real-life examples of sustainability. Being a sustainable business does not More >

Santa Fe Community College: Deep Greening

by Todd Eric Lovato

The green revolution continues at Santa Fe Community College. In recent years, the college has made aggressive moves toward carbon neutrality, environmental sustainability and educating the future workers of NM’s burgeoning renewable energy industry. This deep greening effort is a multifaceted and all-inclusive movement that ranges from heightened conservation programs for the college’s campus and workforce, to multi-million dollar green construction projects and the expansion of green education curricula and workforce training.

“SFCC is working to weave sustainability into the very fabric of the institution,” said SFCC President, Sheila Ortego. “The college serves some 14,500 students each year, More >

Jumpstart New Mexico’s Economy Transition to Clean Energy

by Lilia Diaz

New Mexico has one of the greatest opportunities at its doorstep to become a clean energy economy. Currently there are two petitions in front of the NM Environmental Improvement Board (EIB); one from the advocacy group New Energy Economy (NEE) that recommends a mandatory cap on carbon emissions, and the other from the NM Environment Department that proposes a multi-jurisdictional cap-and-trade program for carbon emissions reductions. If either or both were to be adopted, NM would lead the nation in addressing climate change. While much of the country is struggling with high unemployment, NM could seize this opportunity More >

La Montanita Co-op’s New Grassroots Lending Project

Put our money where our mouth is! The La Montanita Fund

by Robin Seydel

Now that “local foods” are the buzzwords of the day, how to scale up local production has been on everyone’s mind. In many cases, for many farmers, ranchers and other food producers, the issue is often access to capital. By the middle of September 2009’s, Slow Money Conference in Santa Fe, La Montanita co-op staff and board members had a number of attendees asking how they could be a part of our co-op foodshed project. All we could answer was, “good question!”

Then last October, at our annual membership More >

Where I Come From – The Local Voice

by Vicki Pozzebon

When I started my journey with the Santa Fe Alliance in 2006 it didn’t occur to me that my family background would have such a big influence on my daily work. I have a Master’s Degree in Theatre Arts, not a background in economic development. Our “new economy” experts have told me that my lack of economic development experience means I have nothing to unlearn when it comes to the work I do.  When the Santa Fe Alliance began to build out a project to localize food and energy economies for greater community wealth I puzzled over the More >